Interesting catch in the Moth trap

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Moriati
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Interesting catch in the Moth trap

#1

Post by Moriati » August 11th, 2019, 2:06 am

Amongst the many common and worn out specimens found in the Moth trap this weekend was this sad specimen. Noctuidae Small Ranunculus (Hecatera dysodea) Gall.jpg

After spending a good time trawling my books, the nearest match I could find was the Small Ranunculus, believed extinct in Britain until 1997! it has made a recovery due to global warmming and migration from Europe, and has made a strong recovery in the London region with a stronghold on allotments.

The name rang a bell, and a trawl through previous years archives found this lone specimen. Noctuidae Small Ranunculus (Hecatera dysodea) 2 Gall.jpg .

Larval foodplant is lettuce. Where would we be without our Allotments?

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ashgale
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Re: Interesting catch in the Moth trap

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Post by ashgale » August 11th, 2019, 10:21 am

a great find :)
is that the cultivated lettuce or the wild stuff, like the prickly lettuce etc ?

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Re: Interesting catch in the Moth trap

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Post by Appledumpling » August 11th, 2019, 10:51 am

And there's me thinking Ranunculus was Buttercup :roll:

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Moriati
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Re: Interesting catch in the Moth trap

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Post by Moriati » August 11th, 2019, 8:09 pm

ashgale wrote:
August 11th, 2019, 10:21 am
a great find :)
is that the cultivated lettuce or the wild stuff, like the prickly lettuce etc ?
Apparently, both will do nicely. Given their liking for Allotments, and the plotholders laziness in removing plants that have run to seed, these untidy corners must be heaven for hungry munchkins.

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Moriati
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Re: Interesting catch in the Moth trap

#5

Post by Moriati » August 26th, 2019, 10:12 pm

And it gets better.

This fine specimen was in the Moth Trap this morning. How it managed to fit in through the opening is still a mystery? I have always admired this moth and drooled over the photos in the Field Guides but never realised just how big it is. Now, with the larval food plants common and plentiful locally, is this a locally bred specimen, or, has it taken advantage of the strong and hot Southerly winds we have been experiencing in the London Region and flown in from the Continent? It is listed as a migrant.

Enough waffle. I give you the Clifden Nonpareil (Catocala fraxini).

Erebidae Clifden Nonpareil (Catocala fraxini) Gall.jpg

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Re: Interesting catch in the Moth trap

#6

Post by catmando » August 27th, 2019, 8:21 am

that's a great find !
I just looked it up and it gives the wingspan of 75 to 95 mm !
given the fraxini part of the name, I half expected the food source to have been Ash trees, but it turns out to be the Aspen tree instead,
I like the other name it has of Blue Underwing too :)
the page I looked up said that only a small handful of sightings were recorded each year in the UK
so that makes it an even better find :)

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